Cultural Trivia

KÜRTŐSKALÁCS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

 
“Let them eat cake” is the traditional translation of the French phrase (“Qu’ils mangent de la brioche”) as supposedly Marie Antoinette said, in Hungarian ”EGYENEK KALÁCSOT”.

This weekend you are literally invited to eat cake, a very special type, called KÜRTŐSKALÁCS originating in Transylvania which has become very popular in Budapest and elsewhere in Europe recently. CAKE in Hungarian […]

By |October 8th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

KÜRTŐSKALÁCS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

“Let them eat cake” is the traditional translation of the French phrase (“Qu’ils mangent de la brioche”) as supposedly Marie Antoinette said, in Hungarian ”EGYENEK KALÁCSOT”.

This weekend you are literally invited to eat cake, a very special type, called KÜRTŐSKALÁCS originating in Transylvania which has become very popular in Budapest and elsewhere in Europe recently. CAKE in Hungarian […]

By |October 8th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

The 13 Martyrs of Arad

Street names remind Hungarians daily of their history. The Október 6 utca in Lipótváros  (OKTÓBER HAT UTCA) is named so to remember  the execution of the 13 martyrs of Arad (ARADI VÉRTANÚK) in 1949 after the Hungarian honvéd army was defeated by the Habsburgs aided by the Russian Tzarist army. The word VÉRTANÚ sounds more […]

By |October 6th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

GOOD MORNING! WITH A SHOT OF PÁLINKA

Most Hungarians have an uncritical faith in the fact that pálinka is a general remedy for all pain and sorrow. The habit of starting the day with a shot of pálinka, which startles most foreigners, is expressed in the language by the humorous wish of ’PÁLINKÁS JÓ REGGELT!’. The tradition goes back to the times […]

By |September 30th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

END OF SEPTEMBER

At the mentioning of the end of September most Hungarians will recite the first two lines of Sándor Petőfi’s, our national poet’s, gloomy poem:

MÉG NYÍLNAK A VÖLGYBEN A KERTI VIRÁGOK,
MÉG ZÖLDEL A NYÁRFA AZ ABLAK ELŐTT

Below in the valley the flowers are resplendent,
Outside by the window the poplars still glow

The rest of the poem is […]

By |September 28th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

SAUERKRAUT IS GOOD FOR YOU

Autumn is coming and the season of cabbage dishes is starting. When it comes to cabbage –full of vitamin C –  it must be VECSÉSI. Vecsés (Wetschesch), a typically SVÁB (Schwabian i.e. ethnic German) village  22 kms South-East of Pest boasts to have the best SAVANYÚKÁPOSZTA (sauerkraut) , the tradition of making it dating back […]

By |September 25th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

OLD WOMEN’S SUMMER

We are all enjoying the sunny and still warm weather at the end of September and early October called VÉNASSZONYOK NYARA (vén=old asszony=woman –ok=plural nyár=summer –a=genitive), the Hungarian equivalent of Indian Summer.

However, you should be careful using the adjective VÉN in other context. There are three words meaning ’old’ when we refer to people: IDŐS […]

By |September 23rd, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

PICNIC, THE HUNGARIAN WAY

SZÜRET, the grape harvest season has just started. Officially there are 22 borvidék (wine regions) in Hungary, each with their special traditions and flavours. SZÜRETELÉS (grape picking) is a hard job but lots of fun too. Look out for SZÜRETI BÁL  (harvest festival) going to take place all over the country until late October.  One […]

By |September 4th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

JEWISH CULTURAL FESTIVAL 2015

If you are in Budapest between August 30 and September 6, don’t miss the annual Jewish Summer Festival (http://www.zsidokulturalisfesztival.hu/en/ ). Since the collapse of Communism Budapest has enjoyed a revival of Jewish culture. You are welcome to get the full picture during one of Fungarian’s Jewish Heritage Tours (http://fungarian.hu/jewish-heritage-tour/ )

The emblematic folk song SZÓL A […]

By |August 30th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments

Freedom and holiday

The two words are the same in Hungarian: SZABADSÁG meaning ’freedom’ as in e.g. Szabadság híd (Liberty/freedom Bridge) or Szabadság szobor (Liberty Statue, see photo). The root of the word is the adjective SZABAD (free) and thus szabadság is ”free-ness”, and when you are free from work, that’s holiday: SZABADSÁG. Common phrases with the word include […]

By |August 4th, 2015|Cultural Trivia|0 Comments